Mots-clefs

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Collection of Principessa Ismene Chigi Della Rovere. A pair of Louis XVI ormolu-mounted tulipwood, satine, amaranth, olivewood and black and gilt vernis Martin encoignures, by Pierre-Harry Mewesen, late 18th century. Estimate £8,000 – £12,000 ($12,064 – $18,096)Photo Christie’s Image Ltd 2015

Each shaped grey-veined white marble top above a panelled door depicting figures in a pavilion and wooded landscape, enclosing two fitted oak shelves, on a plinth base, both stamped ‘P.H.MEVVESEN’ and ‘JME’; 35 ¼ in. (89.5 cm.) high; 21 ½ in. (54.5 cm.) wide; 17 ½ in. (44 cm.) deep

Notes: Pierre-Harry Mewesen, maître ebéniste in 1766.

Originally from Scandinavia, Pierre-Harry Mewesen worked in Paris and produced high quality furniture in the Louis XV style, as well as transitional and Louis XVI pieces, including commodes, bureaux, secretaires and encoignures. Many examples of his work are decorated with marquetry depicting flowers, musical instruments and trophies and his mounts are usually restrained and discreet. Some of his rarer pieces include oriental lacquer and Vernis Martin such as these encoignures. A closely related secrétaire à abattant with Chinese lacquer and japanned panels, which demonstrate the less common use of lacquer depicting Oriental landscapes, was sold by the descendants of Daniel Grand d’Hauteville (1761-1818) from Château d’Hauteville, Vevey, Switzerland, at Christie’s, London, 30 September 2014, lot 22.

Christie’s. THE COLLECTIONS OF PRINCIPESSA ISMENE CHIGI DELLA ROVERE AND A NOBLE GENOESE FAMILY, 4 February 2015, London, South Kensington

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