Étiquettes

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

13

Attributed to Gennaro Greco, called il Mascacotta (Naples 1663-1714), An Italianate coastal landscape with figures by classical ruins, a harbour beyond; and An Italianate coastal landscape with figures by a colonnade and a harbor (2) A Pair (one illustrated above). Estimate: £6,000 – 8,000. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd 2015.

LONDON.- Christie’s announces the sale of two Italian private collections, the first from the Rome apartment of Principessa Ismene Chigi Della Rovere and the second from the palazzo of a Noble Genoese Family. Comprising over 225 lots this diverse sale offers collectors and decorators a wonderful insight into 20th century Italian style and glamour, presenting a rich and varied selection of Old Master pictures and decorative objects from around the world, which range from 18th century Italian and French furniture and Art Nouveau glass, to Chinese and Japanese works of art. Estimates range from £500 to £25,000 and the pre-sale viewing will be at Christie’s 85 Old Brompton Road from 31 January to 3 February. The auction will be held on 4 February 2015 at Christie’s South Kensington and provides an opportunity to acquire exceptional antiques and works of art from two noble Italian families.

THE COLLECTION OF PRINCIPESSA ISMENE CHIGI DELLA ROVERE

From the 1960s, Princess Ismene Chigi Della Rovere lived the dolce vita, embracing a jet-set lifestyle and visiting the most fashionable destinations in Europe and America. She counted many high society figures of the time amongst her friends and frequently attended glamorous European balls with Christina Onassis, Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, Roger Vadim and Jane Fonda, and Prince Rainier III and Princess Grace of Monaco.

It was through her trips to America that Princess Ismene’s passion for art was fostered by her friendship with the renowned Roman gallery owner Gaspero Del Corso, who introduced her to the highly influential contemporary New York gallerist Leo Castelli. Both the Princess and her sister Anna Maria, then a director of the Marlborough Gallery, were immersed in the New York art scene and often visited the legendary Studio 54 nightclub. The Princess also regularly visited the Gardner family in Massachusetts, as her first daughter Manuela married Stuart Gardner, the descendent of Isabella Stewart Gardner. Isabella Stewart Gardner was one of the foremost female patrons in the late 19th century and founded the museum that bears her name in Boston in 1903 to house her collection.

After returning from New York, the Princess created a stylish collection in her palazzo apartment in Rome. She ingeniously juxtaposed antiques with contemporary art, Art Nouveau glass and Chinese and Japanese works of art. Her emphasis was on style and beauty; epitomised by the pair of Royal Louis-Philippe ormolu four-light candelabra from the Château de Neuilly (estimate: £15,000-25,000). Further highlights include a pair of Japanese gilt-metal mounted and black lacquer Hasamibako (estimate: £5,000-8,000); a Gallé globular glass vase (estimate: £4,000-6,000) and iconic monogramed Louis Vuitton luggage, such as a Biston 60 suitcase and an Alzer Anglais 80 suitcase in monogram canvas (estimate: £1,000-1,500). Now living a quieter life, Princess Ismene has decided to part with her personal collection, which Christie’s is honoured to offer to a new generation of collectors.

7 8 9 12

A pair of Royal Louis-Philippe ormolu four-light candelabra from the Château de Neuilly, circa 1810. Estimate: £15,000-25,000 ($22,920 – $38,200). Photo Christie’s Image Ltd 2014

Each with a flambeau finial on a trumpet-form central stem issuing scroll arms cast with Egyptian female masks and urn nozzles, centred by a palmette and star, on a circular base cast with anthemion and classical urns, stamped to the base ‘ L.P.’ with a crown and ‘N’ and with inventory number ‘23487’; 18 ¼ in. (46.5 cm.) high; 8 ½ in. (21.5 cm.) diameter

Provenance: Almost certainly supplied to duc d’Orléans, later Louis Philippe of France for the Château de Neuilly.

Notes: These superb ormolu candelabra, which display the Egyptian motifs so popular in the Empire period, were almost certainly part of a large commission ordered by the duc d’Orléans, later Louis Philippe of France (1773-1850) for The Château de Neuilly. The marks LP and N record that these candelabra were part of the inventory at the château.

The Château de Neuilly was originally built for Marc Pierre de Voyer d’Argenson, Secretary of State to Louis XV in the 1750s. Early in the 19th Century it belonged to Joachim Murat, one of Napoleon’s most distinguished generals and who subsequently married Napoleon’s youngest sister Caroline. When Murat was made King of Naples in 1808, the Château de Neuilly, together with its contents, passed on to his sister-in-law Pauline, Princess Borghese. When Louis Philippe acquired the château in 1819, he appointed Henri Antione Jacques as head gardener and commissioned Pierre-François-Léonard Fontaine to enlarge the château. During the revolutions of 1848 the château was destroyed.

Other known identical pairs are recorded; a pair in the collections of Baron de Redé and of Baron Guy de Rothschild, sold Sotheby’s, Monaco, 26 May 1975, second day’s sale, lot 241 and bearing the inventory numbers 12426 and 12427, a pair sold anonymously at Christie’s, London, 21 May 1996, lot 252 and bearing the inventory numbers 23492 and 23488, and two pairs sold from the Collection of Mr & Mrs Stephen C. Hilbert, sold, Sotheby’s, New York, 24 May 2007, lots 21 and 22, and bearing the inventory numbers 23498, 23488 and 23492.

8

A pair of Japanese gilt-metal mounted and black lacquer Hasamibako, Edo period, late 18th-early 19th century. Estimate: £5,000 – £8,000 ($7,640 – $12,224). Photo Christie’s Image Ltd 2014

Each decorated overall in Aoi mon and foliate scrolls, with a gold paper lined interior, the underside of the lids with shellac, with corner mounts and side handles; 14 ¼ in. (36.5 cm.) high; 24 ¾ in. (63 cm.) wide; 18 ¼ in. (46.5 cm.) deep.

9

A Gallé globular glass vase, circa 1925Estimate: £4,000 – £6,000 ($6,112 – $9,168). Photo Christie’s Image Ltd 2014

The cased glass with dispersed iridescent surface, deeply marked in intaglio Gallé; 9 7/8 in. (25 cm.) wide; 9 ½ in. (24.2 cm.) high.

12

A Biston 60 suitcase and an Alzer Anglais 80 suitcase in monogram canvas, Louis Vuitton, circa 1960Estimate: £1,000 – £1,500 ($1,528 – $2,292). Photo Christie’s Image Ltd 2014

Both composite leather and brass bound, with handle to top, both with cream lined interior, the Alzer Anglais 80 with removable tray, the larger suitcase lock numbered ‘123503’ , the interior label numbered ‘877446’, the smaller suitcase lock numbered ‘121364’ and the interior label numbered ‘876302’. The larger suitcase: 10 x 31 ½ x 20 ½ in. (25.5 x 80 x 52 cm.). The smaller suitcase: 7 x 24 x 17 in. (18 x 61 x 43 cm.)

THE COLLECTION OF A NOBLE GENOESE FAMILY

Also offered in this sale is the collection of a Noble Genoese family, which comprises Italian furniture, porcelain, clocks and silver together with Old Master paintings. Assembled during the 20th century with the help of one of Italy’s most renowned antique dealers, Pietro Accorsi, many of the pieces in this collection bear his trademark label, with the address of his shop ‘via Po.55, Torino’. Accorsi, who was well respected in the European art world as an advisor and dealer to numerous prestigious collectors and institutions, helped to source predominantly Genoese pieces for this collection. Highlights include a North Italian ormolu-mounted tulipwood-banded and kingwood bureau plat (estimate: £20,000-30,000); a set of six late 18th century Piedmontese parcel-gilt and pale grey-painted fauteuils (estimate: £5,000-8,000) and a pair of paintings attributed to Gennaro Greco, called il Mascacotta, both depicting Italianate coastal landscapes (estimate: £6,000-8,000).

1

A North Italian ormolu-mounted tulipwood-banded and kingwood bureau plat, Genoa, mid 18th century. Estimate £20,000 – £30,000 ($30,560 – $45,840). Photo Christie’s Image Ltd 2014

The shaped top inset with leather above three frieze drawers opposing false drawers, on slender cabriole legs, some sabots replaced; 32 in. (81 cm.) high; 49 in. (124 cm.) wide; 26 ¾ in. (68 cm.) deep.

Notes: This desk’s sinuous curved form and pierced angle mounts are characteristic of Genoese furniture produced in the mid-18th century, and emblematic of the influence of French design given Genoa’s vicinity to France. The Genoese version of the Bureau Plat or diplomatica was executed with Rosewood and either tulipwood, kingwood or rich walnut. A related Bureau Plat is illustrated in L.Caumont Caimi, L’Ebanisteria Genovese del Settecento, Parma, 1995, p.100, fig.43. A similar example of this form was sold Christie’s, New York, 22 November 2011, lot 41.

2 3

A set of six parcel-gilt and pale grey-painted fauteuils, Piedmontese, late 18th century. Estimate £5,000 – £8,000 ($7,640 – $12,224). Photo Christie’s Image Ltd 2014

The frames carved throughout with guilloche, each with oval padded back and stuff-over seat on turned stop-fluted tapering legs, covered in green and cream striped silk, decoration probably refreshed; 34 ½ in. (88 cm.) high.

4 5 6

Attributed to Gennaro Greco, called il Mascacotta (Naples 1663-1714), An Italianate coastal landscape with figures by classical ruins, a harbour beyond; and An Italianate coastal landscape with figures by a colonnade and a harbour. Estimate £6,000 – £8,000 ($9,168 – $12,224). Photo Christie’s Image Ltd 2014

oil on canvas, 19 ¾ x 30 ¾ in. (50.2 x 78.2 cm.) (2).