Étiquettes

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12

A Jizhou resist-decorated ‘Fenghuang’ vase, meiping, Southern Song dynasty (1127-1279). Estimate HK$800,000 – HK$1,500,000 ($103,603 – $194,256). Price Realized HK$2,920,000 ($378,304). Photo Christie’s Image Ltd 2014

The vase is resist-decorated on two sides with a pair of fenghuang amidst cloud scrolls that are detailed in brown slip, and reserved against a dark brown glaze that continues over the lipped mouth rim and falls to the edge of the foot. 11 in. (28.1 cm.) high, box

Notes: The fenghuang, or phoenix, comprises feng, the male and huang, the female bird. They can be differentiated by their tails; the male with his segmented into four filaments and the female with a fanciful scroll for its tail. The phoenix is an auspicious bird that has traditionally represented peace and prosperity.

The delicate decoration on this meiping was produced by first affixing a stencil to the surface and then immersed foot-first in a dark brown glaze. When the glaze stabilized, the stencils were removed to reveal the reserved designs which were further painted with an iron-rich slip.

Compare to a similar meiping illustrated by Robert Mowry, Hare’s Fur, Tortoiseshell, and Partridge Feathers: Chinese Brown-and Black-Glazed Ceramics, 400-1400, Harvard University Art Museums, 1996, pp. 253-5, no. 103.

CHRISTIE’S. IMPORTANT CHINESE CERAMICS AND WORKS OF ART, 26 November 2014, Convention Hall